Classes‎ > ‎5th Class Mr Breslin‎ > ‎

Science Project

Science Blast

posted Mar 7, 2019, 3:23 PM by Owen Breslin   [ updated May 2, 2019, 3:30 PM ]

The boys and girls of 5th class have been busy recently completing a science project which tested which soil type would be best for growing lettuce. We tested peaty soil, clay, sandy soil and loam to see which one would prove to be the best. As we predicted Loam provided the best overall results, On Wed 6th March we took this project to Science Blast 2019 in the RDS. We will have a full report tomorrow, but for now here are the pictures from what was an excellent day.

Science Blast 2019


Progress report 15 days

posted Feb 27, 2019, 4:23 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 27, 2019, 4:23 AM ]


Our plants are progressing day by day. 
Subject A - Peaty soil
Leaves are small, there are 4 plants germinated and the highest is 35mm.
Subject B - Clay
Leaves are medium, height is 45mm and there are 9 plants germinated.
Subject C - Chalky soil
Leaves are large, height is 50mm and there are 3 plants germinated.
Subject D - Loamy soil
Leaves are medium, height is 49mm and there are 9 plants germinated.

The chalky soil is by far the driest soil and despite a very slow start, the plants are growing  the best.

It should be noted that many of our plants have stretched and they have very thin stems as they have stretched looking for more sunlight. Some of the plants in the loamy soil have been buried.

The hydroponic plants are all growing very well and have not stretched as much.  
To try and combat stretching we are using jenga blocks to tilt the pots towards the sun.

Progress Report 8 days

posted Feb 20, 2019, 5:02 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 20, 2019, 5:02 AM ]

Our plants have grown as follows

Peaty soil - 13mm
Clay - 22mm
Chalky soil - 19 mm
Loamy soil - 28mm

Progress report 6 days

posted Feb 18, 2019, 7:19 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 18, 2019, 7:19 AM ]

Our seeds have germinated! As you can see from our picture our lettuce seeds have germinated ovr the weekend. The following is the progress so far

Peaty soil - 10 mm
Clay  - 14mm
Chalky / sandy soil  - 8 mm
Loam - 15 mm

It is also noticeable that more seeds germinated in the clay and Loam while there was a poor germination rate in the chalky soil.

Sowing the seeds

posted Feb 18, 2019, 6:23 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 18, 2019, 2:49 PM ]

Lettuce seeds have been planted into the following four types of soil. Peaty soil, clay, chalky / sandy soil and loamy soil. We planted a number of seeds to allow for failure of some seeds to germinate. We watered the pots with the same amount of water. They have been put on the windowsill, next  to the radiator.


Hydroponics

posted Feb 18, 2019, 6:22 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 18, 2019, 2:53 PM ]

We also set up an experiment on hydroponics . We started by testing the water. It was quite alkaline so we corrected the PH of the water by adding lemon juice. 

Then we added the  correct amount of nutrients to the water After that we soaked some  rockwool plugs overnight in the nutrients infused water.
We then placed then into the plug trays. Next we sowed some cress and lettuce seeds into the rockwool plugs.




Testing the soil

posted Feb 13, 2019, 5:56 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 13, 2019, 6:07 AM ]

 We started by going to our school garden examining some different soils.We collected some soil samples and classified them inside by doing the following:
  • look at the colour
  • smell it
  • rub it between our fingers to see how it feels
  • try and roll it into a ball
  • see is it dry or moist
  • look for clumps
  • check for sand or gravel
  • look for minibeasts
  • does it contain decaying plant or animal material (humus)

Then we named them sample A,B,C and D.
We felt that A was a loamy soil, B was more of a peaty soil, C was a sandy soil and D was a peaty soil.


    About our soil...
Sample A was a light brown colour,smelt like clay,it felt smooth and sticky,we couldn't roll it into a ball or like a sausage,it felt moist,the size of the particles in the soil were small and it contained clay,worms and roots.
Sample B was a black colour,it didn't smell like anything,it felt rough and sticky,we couldn't roll it into a ball or like a sausage,it felt moist,the size of the particles in the soil were small and medium,it contained clay,no mini-beasts it also contained roots.
Sample C was a gold-brown colour,it didn't smell like anything,it felt rough,you couldn't roll it into a ball or like a sausage,it felt in-between moist and dry,the size of the particles in the soil were medium,it contained clay,no mini-beasts and roots.
Sample D was a dark brown colour,it smelt like grass,it felt rough,you couldn't roll it into a ball or like a sausage,it felt moist,the size of the particles in the soil were medium,it contained clay, no mini-beasts and rocks and leaves.

We then performed an experiment by putting each sample into a jar with water and then shaking it to organise the layers.We found out that the heaviest soil sunk and settled  to the bottom and the lightest soil floated and lay on the top.

change 2

posted Feb 13, 2019, 4:09 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 13, 2019, 4:09 AM ]

sdf

Change of view

posted Feb 13, 2019, 4:08 AM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Feb 13, 2019, 4:08 AM ]


A first look at the school garden

posted Nov 7, 2018, 3:27 PM by Owen Breslin   [ updated Nov 7, 2018, 3:27 PM ]

We went out to the school garden to see how our vegetables, shrubs and flowers were getting on. It was clear to see that it had not been a good year for our vegetable patch. In fact the entire garden was looking far from its best.  The pupils were asked to discuss in groups the problems that were affecting the garden. 

The following are some of the observations that were made:
  • vegetables very small, not growing properly

  • weeds were flourishing, in particular which Mr Breslin identified as Mares Tail, which is an invasive weed

  • there was very little Autumn colour from our flowers
  • there were leaves everywhere 

  • paths were overgrown with weeds

  • one bed seemed to be too much in the shade and there was not much growing underneath

  • the raised beds were disorganised

  • the soil seems very dry

We formed the following questions
  • How can we get rid of weeds without spraying?(in particular mares tail)
  • what plants could we grow in the shade?
  • how can we improve the soil?
  • are all fertilisers the same?  are they good for biodiversity?
  • can we compost the leaves?
  • what flowers can we plant to attract more pollinators?
  • are there more suitable vegetables we should be planting?
  • how can we make our vegetables grow bigger?
  • how can we protect our vegetables from pests e.g. caterpillars, blight
  • are there any safe sprays?

1-10 of 11